Stacking the Shelves with a new #bookhaul (14 July 2018)!

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Stacking the Shelves is a weekly meme hosted by Tynga’s Reviews and Reading Reality, which is all about sharing the books that you’ve acquired in the past week!

 

I didn’t manage to post a Stacking the Shelves last week so this book haul is from the last fortnight. I’ve had a tough couple of weeks with various things happening so I did treat myself to quite a few new books…

 

The first four in my post today are books that I’d had on my wish list for ages and decided to treat myself to them last week. They all arrived together and I’m really looking forward to reading them soon.

 

I Like You Just Fine When You’re Not Around by Ann Garvin

The Good Goodbye by Carla Buckley

Hugo and Rose by Bridget Foley

Wrecked by Maria Padian

A Noise Downstairs by Linwood Barclay

I was sent an ARC of this book last week and I read the whole novel in one sitting earlier this week. Once I picked it up I literally couldn’t put it down, I simply had to know what was going on! I’m part way through writing a review so hopefully I’ll get that posted in the next week.

The Great Unexpected by Dan Mooney

This book arrived this week and was a total surprise. It says on the blurb that it will appeal to people who loved The Easy Way Out (you can read my review of this here if you’d like to) which I did really love so I’m definitely adding this one to my TBR.

How to Remember by J. M. Monroe

I was offered the chance to receive an ARC of this book and I immediately said yes as I am always drawn to books that explore grief and complicated family relationships. I’m really looking forward to getting to this book.

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Mansfield and Me by Sarah Laing

I treated myself to this graphic memoir from @eyeandlightning books over the weekend. I hadn’t heard of this indie publisher before but they had a great offer on at the weekend and I saw this memoir and I knew I had to get my hands on it. It arrived yesterday and it’s beautiful, I can’t wait to read it.

My husband took me out for coffee this week and I spotted a bookshop so we had to go in! I’m working on my standing again at the moment and I managed to stand up with my crutch to look at the books in one section of the shop. I felt like deserved a reward to I treated myself to these three books…

Blame by Jeff Abbott

This book was a (sort of) cover buy as I’d never heard of it before but the cover is so striking that I noticed it immediately. Once I read the blurb I knew I had to get it. I’m really enjoying twisty thrillers at the moment so I expect I’ll be reading this one soon.

The Lost by Mari Hannah

I love Mari Hannah’s writing so I’ve been meaning to grab a copy of this book for a while now. It seemed the perfect time to buy it this week so I’m keen to read it as soon as possible.

The Day She Disappeared by Christobel Kent

This has also been on my wish list ever since it first came out so I was thrilled when I spotted it on the shelves.

 

No Further Questions by Gillian McAllister

This was a kindle pre-order from a while ago and it appeared on my kindle last week and I’m so keen to read it soon. I might pick it up as soon as I’ve read the couple of review books that I have on the go at the moment.

Into the Black by Rowland White

I’ve always been obsessed with space travel so when I spotted this book about the space shuttle Columbia in the kindle sale I snapped it up. It’s quite a long book so I might start it soon and dip in and out of it.

The Accusation by Zosia Wand

I love Zosia Wand’s previous novel Trust Me (you can read my review of Trust Me here if you’d like to) so when I saw she had a new book out I couldn’t one-click fast enough! I don’t think this will be on my TBR for very long!

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

I’ve yet to read anything by Celeste Ng (although I do have her previous book on my TBR) but I feel sure she’s an author I’ll love. I grabbed this book in a kindle deal earlier this week and I’m so keen to read this. I think I might make this the first book I read by this author.

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin

This book passed me by when it was on the Man Booker International long list but I’ve recently seen a review of it that made me really want to read it so I decided to treat myself.

The Flight of Cornelia Blackwood by Susan Elliot Wright

I requested this on NetGalley as I was really intrigued by the blurb so I was thrilled when I was approved to read it. The novel’s not due out until next year so I might try and hold off reading it for a little while yet. I am really keen to read it though!

 

Bookworm by Lucy Mangan

I treated myself to the audio book of this as I was having a really bad day and wanted a book that would pick me up a bit. This book was perfect and I utterly adored it. I think the author is a similar age to me as she read so many of the same books as me in childhood so it was a real trip down memory lane.

Worth Dying For: The Power and Politics of Flags by Tim Marshall

I bought this on a whim when it was an Audible deal of the day last week. I’ve read other books by Tim Marshall and found him really informative but easy to follow so I was keen to read more by him. This one sounds fascinating and I’m hoping to listen to it soon.

 


 

Have you got any new books recently? I’d love to know. Have you read any of the books in my book haul? Are there any that you recommend me getting to sooner rather than later? Feel free to leave a link to your own Stacking the Shelves post in the comments! 🙂

 

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#BookReview: Wheelchairs, Perjury & The London Marathon by Tim Marshall @AuthorightUKPR ‏@Authoright

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About the Book

The top wheelchair athletes of today enjoy the same high-profile exposure and admiration as their able-bodied counterparts. This has come about partly through wheelchair participation in mass fun-running events such as the Great North Run.

Wheelchairs, Perjury and the London Marathon charts disability sports pioneer Tim Marshall MBE’s journey from the rock-climbing accident which left him paralysed, to becoming a trailblazer for wheelchair racing.

The fun-runs of the 1980s enabled wheelchair road-racing to flourish, and Marshall took part in marathons and half-marathons where wheelchairs were welcome to compete. This did not, however, include The London Marathon, from which wheelchairs were banned for the first two years. This is the story of how this prohibition was overturned, told from the competitor’s point of view. Tim and many others campaigned for the inclusion of wheelchairs in The London Marathon in the face of huge opposition from the organisers.

Finally, in 1983 the efforts of sportsmen and women, the press, the Greater London Council and members of parliament resulted in a breakthrough just ten days before the 1983 marathon, which at last agreed to wheelchair participation.

My Thoughts

I was thrilled when I was offered the chance to read and review Wheelchairs, Perjury and the London Marathon for the blog tour as it’s a subject that is really close to my heart. I’m partially paralysed from a spinal cord injury in my neck and whilst the nature of my injury means I can’t self-propel in a wheelchair I’m always inspired by people who have pushed society to accept wheelchair users.

Tim Marshall suffered a spinal cord injury whilst rock climbing as a young man but he never lost his passion for life and taking part in sport. After his initial recovery period he undertook a research trip in America to look at how sports for wheelchair users was being approached and this led him to attempt to set up more opportunities for wheelchair users in the UK. This ultimately led to him pushing for there to be a wheelchair race within the London Marathon. The opposition that he faced is utterly staggering, I had to put the book down at a couple of points just in sheer shock at some of the responses he got from the event organisers.

Even though Marshall’s fight for a wheelchair race within the London Marathon is over thirty years ago now it was still shocking to read that one of the reasons for refusing him entry is because they didn’t want it to turn into a ‘multi-purpose jamboree’! I was gobsmacked reading this because the London Marathon allows fun runners in all their glorious outfits and yet it was the thought of serious athletes who happened to be wheelchair-bound that would throw the race into some kind of disrepute. I’m still reeling from this now. The organisers continued to give Marshall different reasons as to why wheelchair racers couldn’t be included each time he contacted them; all of them utterly unfounded.

The book also covers things like how wheelchair athletes came to have the more sporty wheelchairs that we’re used to seeing today as initially they were racing in their ordinary, every day chairs which were not dissimilar to the self-propelled wheelchairs you see people using today (although a lot heavier than we have now). I’d never really thoughts about how hard it would be to race in a chair like that with the wheels being straight and the high chance of your hand getting caught between your wheel and the wheel of the chair alongside you, or the lack of support for your body. I found it so interesting to read how sporting wheelchairs came to be and how the adaptations slowly came to be accepted by the racing associations.

Marshall’s passion to gain parity for disabled athletes and his determination to tell his story in the most accurate way possible really comes through in this book. I enjoyed the level of detail in the sharing of what remained of his correspondence with people relevant to his struggle, and to see how wheelchair racers were eventually accepted as part of the London Marathon.

I am so grateful for people like Tim Marshall because it is through them that society begins to shift its standpoint on how it views disabled people. Seeing the response in recent years to the paralympics, for example, and how nations have got behind their disabled athletes has been incredible. I will be watching the London Marathon this year with renewed appreciation of just how much perseverance it took to get wheelchair athletes racing alongside everyone else.

Wheelchairs, Perjury and the London Marathon is such an interesting read. It encompasses how Marshall discovered wheelchair sport, then onto how he, along with others, fought, and won, the right to race in the London Marathon. This is a fascinating, inspiring and important book. I really enjoyed reading it and it’s one I definitely recommend.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher. All thoughts are my own.

Wheelchairs, Perjury and the London Marathon is out now in paperback and ebook from here!

About the Author

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Tim Marshall was born in 1946 and gained an M.Sc in Statistics from the London School of Economics, working at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris before taking up a position at Birmingham University. His lectureship in the Medical School followed by his appointment as Associate Professor in Epidemiology and Public Health ended with his retirement in 2006. He has enjoyed a lifelong love of sport including wheelchair racing, skiing and sailing.

You can follow the rest of this blog tour at the following stops:

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